Studying with Oisín Roche

I spent a morning, along with fellow illustrator Padhraig Nolan, learning from Irish portrait artist Oisín Roche [One of his many portraits above]. He’s an artist who has studied the techniques of the great portrait artists of the past and has a phenomenal grasp of how to describe flesh tones [along with everything else]. As an illustrator, I rely a great deal on whatever my own inner vision generates and what my drawing skills can support, and true-to-life depictions aren’t absolutely necessary when the message of the illustration is paramount. However, I feel that I’d like to continue to strengthen my basic drawing and painting skills -because that’s what has always attracted me to art anyway, and there’s always something to learn. I picked up a great deal even in the first minutes and it proved to be an invaluable few hours overall. Especially with regard to the palette -I’ve never been one to limit myself to the basic few colours really needed to complete a painting! I’m looking forward to the next session…I’ll keep you posted. Meanwhile here are a few pictures from the session -showing Oisín’s own work. Sorry about the picture quality; I had to use my phone’s camera and it has a lens the size of a gnat’s chuff. [Don’t get technical -you’ll lose them -Ed]


As this was a study, Oisín mentioned that the reason for drawing the subject in charcoal directly onto the canvas was to save time getting to the colour work. I’m not quite sure how he would’ve approached the task otherwise.


The charcoal drawing was spray-fixed and a wash of burnt umber acrylic applied.


And the study in oils begins…I’ll bring a decent camera the next time.

More Doodlecraft

I was in a position, yesterday morning, to just sit down and spend my time doodling. Fortunately, I had all the material with me [which doesn’t happen often, believe me] including a 4B pencil which makes it a pleasure to build up dark areas. The first drawing shown here started out as a preparatory sketch for an editorial job but developed into something else entirely. It might form an element of an artwork further down the line, who knows?

The second doodle is another working of a recurring theme. I have a small stove in my studio, that belches black smoke and smuts all over my studio during the winter -mmmm, nice. Winter means about half the year, here in cold, dank Ireland by the way. This particular match of furnace rugby [Dublin 1934] was called off before half-time after rain soused play.

Irish Times Business This Week illustration

Kevin McSherry illustration for the Irish Times
Kevin McSherry: for the Irish Times

This is a review of this week’s BTW illustration. The topic: How banks are fawning all over us in an embarrassing way in order to lend us money. [For my part, I insist that all loan negotiations be carried out while my bank manager is dressed in a gimp outfit]. Below is one of the first idea sketches [there were others, but along different lines].

I then worked up a more elaborate sketch to show the editor:

Once approved, I squared up my stretched paper and drew the composition accurately. Don’t try that banker’s position at home. I had to hire another model, after the first one put his back out trying to achieve the desired pose. I had to remove him from the premises in a wheelbarrow:

New Pencils


I bought a couple of new 4B pencils in Kennedy’s the other day. Beautifully soft smooth leads and a pleasure to doodle with. Hence the above sketch; done while on the phone. That’s a real space-filler of a blog post, if ever there was one!

Irish Times Illustration: Four Men in a Boat

It’s been a tough week. Whatever about the good weather outside; it’s been snowed-under here in the studio. Preparation, which is almost complete for my onslaught on France through the Marie Bastille Agency and projects for American clients have kept me slaving over my drawing boards. Then the Irish Times presented me with a mind-warping piece of financial text. Anyway, between the editor and myself we fixed on an idea over the phone, which I quickly scribbled onto a receipt. Whoever heard of an illustrator who had decent pads of paper handy?

That evening, on the settee in front of the telly, I worked up the idea into a more finished sketch and squared the drawing up for the following morning. Luckily, summer TV schedules determined that there was bugger-all worth watching on the idiot’s lantern [as my old French teacher, Mr. Dansie used to call the telly – Me: ‘What does ‘bateau’ mean, Mr. Dansie?’ Dansie: ‘It means you haven’t been listening, McSherry’ followed by, ‘I suppose you’ve been glued to the idiot’s lantern again’.].

Finally, I managed to get the final art into the old lady of D’Olier Street at lunchtime. Now, what’s on the lantern…?

 

Luvverly Dunmore East


Dunmore East, from the Waterford Tourism site

We’ve just returned from a week’s holiday in Dunmore East -and once again, I don’t have a single sketch to show for it. This is a recurrent theme in my life, good intentions thwarted by indolence. It is a lovely, lovely spot, no doubt about it and kick-started another little ongoing theme -thoughts of relocation away from the big smoke. However, the reverie was broken at the long weekend by hordes of city heads, intent on relocating their rubbish onto the beach. Why do people do that?

But, hey -the water was goooood. I encountered a couple of good-natured jellyfish [they didn’t sting me] and we chatted about where to site the blue flag. There’s also a cave adjacent to the beach where there’s some of the best-carved graffiti I’ve ever seen. From as far back as 1823. Forget your black markers -a couple of these messages looked as if they had hired a stone mason to realise them.

Scanning the Horizon


Lately, I’ve been working on a few projects that have been over A3 in physical size. Notably a suite of illustrations for brand developers Island Bridge and for the Royal Canadian Mint [That’s money, not sweets; though confusingly it did feature a polar bear]. Confident in my reprographic background, I thought they could all go straight down to my local repro bureau for digitising on their high-end drum-scanner. Well, it seems that things have changed somewhat since I left my last full-time job in a repro house, 11 years ago. Apparently, most of the old scanning behemoths have bitten the dust, been sold to China or shagged out into skips. Imagine that! These things must have cost about half a million squid when I were a lad and now they’ve been drummed out, much like myself, [only they lasted longer]. All the Crosfields have gone to Hell, it might be said, and been replaced with tiny little desktop scanners that you can buy out of petty cash.

Ah, but there’s a catch…just try scanning flat-art that’s bigger than A3 -even in your A3 desktop. You’ll get a pain in your face stitching those files together. That’s why I was relieved when I discovered that Master Photo. still have their Crosfield 640 running -and I saw it today when I dropped in the art. What a beast. What reassuring solidity. What the Hell are we going to do when the old dinosaur finally lays down her old head and dies?

New Gallery for Kilkenny

Maestro artiste-turned-impresario Roger O’Reilly [AKA Rodge] is about to open his new gallery in Kilkenny city. He has been collecting work from many sources including a selection of McSherry prints. The gallery will open on Friday 19th May [so he’ll be sweating about now] and it’s at, 1 Saint Kieran Street, in Kilkenny City. If you’re down that direction…

Step by Step Movie


A Very Bouncy Project
I’ve just completed a small movie, tracking the course of a single illustration. It should go some way to explain how I work -at least once rough sketches have been approved by the client. I had enormous fun making it. Basically, it’s a series of still shots taken while the artwork was being hand-painted in acrylic on Arches watercolour paper [my preferred method!].
Click here for the movie
You’ll notice that I decided some way into the work to eliminate the background. It’s a decision I allowed myself as I had complete control over the final look; the final art not being created for a client.

The thing that really got me excited about the project was licencing the music. It’s the first time I’ve ever ventured into the whole area of licencing a piece of art as a client. Joanna at www.penguincafe.com was wonderful, however, and seemed enthused about the idea. I was sad to learn of Simon Jeffes’ [the Penguin’s composer and founder] untimely death some years ago; it completely passed me by. I’ve loved his eccentric music since the early eighties, although I think he even arranged music for the absurd Sex Pistols film ‘The Great Rock ‘n’ Roll Swindle’, so the PCO go back quite a bit further.

Enjoy the movie.

What a Strange Way to Make a Living…


So, purveyors of ‘visual assets’, Stockbyte have been sold to Getty in what must be the world’s blandest and most passionless corporate deal. Just imagine what the celebrations were like: Off to the charity shop to buy an old grey suit and shiny tie. Then down to the local greasy spoon for a slap-up feed of reheated leftovers and cola from the slop-catcher!

$135m? Double Take wouldn’t have given them yesterday’s chip wrapper for it.

Just to celebrate the deal [but not so much that we draw attention to ourselves] Double Take illustrates this article with an appropriate image. A typically charmless image of a pathetically grateful-looking handshake. That must be Getty on the left.

Mmmm – While I think of it, I have a bag of used batteries here… Mr Getty!… Mr Getty!